Inaugaral meeting of the women in arb movement

Time for Women to Branch Out with a Career in Working with Trees

Mon, 2018-12-10 09:11 xxMon, 2018-12-10 09:11

As reported by the BBC, a new initiative is aiming to encourage more women to consider a career working with trees.

Set up by the Arboriculture Association, a new working group is designed to promote roles in arboriculture to women. The industry is traditionally male-dominated, with 90% of those working in arboriculture being male.

The Women in Arboriculture group is designed to promote the arboriculture industry at entry level, as well as supporting women who are already on the industry to develop their skills, and ensure that the arboriculture industry becomes more diverse going forward.

The group offers support for women in the industry via a support network, careers advice, mentor guidance, promoting kit-fitting issues and promoting diversity. The working group also promotes the industry by visiting schools and colleges, develops mentoring programmes, shares knowledge and stands up to those who are being subjected to discrimination.

Arboriculture is the art of caring for trees, and is related to job roles such as tree surgery, tree nursery work and also contract management. 

Jacqui Waring, from Inverness, has been involved with aboriculture for 23 years and is getting involved with the push to increase roles for women in the field. Jacqui specialises in preparing plans for protecting trees on development site, but was also keen to outline that the field of arboriculture can include many different roles for women, including research, lecturing and charity campaigns.

East Durham College teaches arboriculture tree surgery courses at our Houghall campus on the outskirts of Durham. If you're a young woman or man who'd like to get involved with tree surgery - take a look at the arboriculture page on our website to find out more information about this exciting career route.

For more information on the Women in Arboriculture movement, please visit the Trees.org.uk website by clicking here.

All photo credit to Trees.org.uk.